gabedelahaye:

If I have a point—and I am not sure that I do—it is that we do not have to give a quote to the New York Times just because they asked us for a quote. We do not have to write a Tweet just because we are waiting in line for the bathroom. We can spend entire days in silence if we so choose. You can keep your mouth shut. It is possible.

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culture Internet social media

culturite:

The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age

From a cutting-edge cultural commentator, a bold and brilliant challenge to cherished notions of the Internet as the great leveler of our age
The Internet has been hailed as an unprecedented democratizing force, a place where everyone can be heard and all can participate equally. But how true is this claim? In a seminal dismantling of techno-utopian visions, The People’s Platform argues that for all that we “tweet” and “like” and “share,” the Internet in fact reflects and amplifies real-world inequities at least as much as it ameliorates them. Online, just as off-line, attention and influence largely accrue to those who already have plenty of both.
What we have seen so far, Astra Taylor says, has been not a revolution but a rearrangement. Although Silicon Valley tycoons have eclipsed Hollywood moguls, a handful of giants like Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook remain the gatekeepers. And the worst habits of the old media model—the pressure to seek easy celebrity, to be quick and sensational above all—have proliferated online, where “aggregating” the work of others is the surest way to attract eyeballs and ad revenue. When culture is “free,” creative work has diminishing value and advertising fuels the system. The new order looks suspiciously like the old one.
We can do better, Taylor insists. The online world does offer a unique opportunity, but a democratic culture that supports diverse voices and work of lasting value will not spring up from technology alone. If we want the Internet to truly be a people’s platform, we will have to make it so.

culturite:

The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age

From a cutting-edge cultural commentator, a bold and brilliant challenge to cherished notions of the Internet as the great leveler of our age

The Internet has been hailed as an unprecedented democratizing force, a place where everyone can be heard and all can participate equally. But how true is this claim? In a seminal dismantling of techno-utopian visions, The People’s Platform argues that for all that we “tweet” and “like” and “share,” the Internet in fact reflects and amplifies real-world inequities at least as much as it ameliorates them. Online, just as off-line, attention and influence largely accrue to those who already have plenty of both.

What we have seen so far, Astra Taylor says, has been not a revolution but a rearrangement. Although Silicon Valley tycoons have eclipsed Hollywood moguls, a handful of giants like Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook remain the gatekeepers. And the worst habits of the old media model—the pressure to seek easy celebrity, to be quick and sensational above all—have proliferated online, where “aggregating” the work of others is the surest way to attract eyeballs and ad revenue. When culture is “free,” creative work has diminishing value and advertising fuels the system. The new order looks suspiciously like the old one.

We can do better, Taylor insists. The online world does offer a unique opportunity, but a democratic culture that supports diverse voices and work of lasting value will not spring up from technology alone. If we want the Internet to truly be a people’s platform, we will have to make it so.

(via towerofsleep)

culture tech internet journalism

timemagazine:

Ten years ago the government built a totally private, anonymous network. Now it’s a haven for criminals. Our new issue explores the secret web: where drugs, porn and murder live online. Read an excerpt now.(Illustration by Justin Metz for TIME)

timemagazine:

Ten years ago the government built a totally private, anonymous network. Now it’s a haven for criminals. Our new issue explores the secret web: where drugs, porn and murder live online. Read an excerpt now.

(Illustration by Justin Metz for TIME)

Internet dark web media

Newsweek: 'iCRAZY'

THIS GIF.

mintaraley:

I was reading the letters that Newsweek readers had sent in, expressing their feelings on the previous issue of Newsweek (July 16, 2012). The cover featured: “iCRAZY: Panic. Depression. Psychosis. How connection addiction is rewiring out brains.”

Manzir Ahmed of Montreal, Quebec wrote:

Most people don’t prioritize the Internet over life’s other activities. For example, if I knew the other guys were playing soccer today, I’d go join them. I wouldn’t say no because I have Internet-related commitments—that’s just silly. The Internet is what I use in my spare time. So I’d argue that the Internet doesn’t create lonely people, it’s where the lonely dwell excessively.

…Tumblr? ^

image

(Source: Newsweek)

iCrazy Internet loneliness digital

"When we watch students with books, there’s a very different experience – there’s that power of having something physical that they own, particularly when they write and see their name in print: it’s always there. With computers, it’s gone at the touch of a button."
-Dave Eggers, novelist and founder of 826 National

"When we watch students with books, there’s a very different experience – there’s that power of having something physical that they own, particularly when they write and see their name in print: it’s always there. With computers, it’s gone at the touch of a button."

-Dave Eggers, novelist and founder of 826 National

children reading books internet new media publishing

"A nation’s journalists and writers, like its poets and story-tellers, are the eyes, ears, and mouths of the people. When journalists cannot freely speak of what they see and hear of the reality that surrounds them, the people cannot see, hear, or speak it either."
-

Russell Banks, American Author, to colleagues during a PEN International mission to Mexico that is encouraging law enforcement to better protect journalists.

As the Committee to Protect Journalists notes, 43 journalists have been murdered in Mexico since 2006

(via futurejournalismproject)

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

journalism writer writing freedom of speech freedom of the press SOPA PIPA Internet censorship

Talking To The Nerdist’s Chris Hardwick | The Awl

For The Awl, I interviewed Chris Hardwick of The Nerdist (and, yes, “Singled Out,” Gen Xers!):

How did you cultivate your interests in comedy and comics while growing up? That was pre-Internet, so were you lurking in arcades and comic book shops?

That’s exactly it. The distribution is much wider now, but back then, we just had a different way of acquiring that content. If it meant something to you, you would find it. It was almost more satisfying as a nerd, in a way, because you did have to go on a quest for those things. And they were treasures that you had to hunt to find, whether it was underground comedy tapes that you would trade with someone or old comic books that you would trade—it was more in the physical world and it wasn’t a digital process.

Read the rest of the thing.

comics chris hardwick nerdist comedy humor stand-up video games internet