"In terms of social media, a lot of times we’re just looking to see if this is somebody we want to work with or are they really … what’s the word I’m looking for … *strange* on social media circles, or lacking a level of professionalism in their online presence. Let’s just say there are some folks who have a Twitter/Facebook presence that’s a little … aggressive or antagonistic."
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Literary agent Kristin Nelson on what she looks for in a potential author’s social media presence

Read the rest of the interview over at Scratch Magazine!

literary agents social media author writing books

So good: ”The Making of Narrative Non-fiction: From Idea to Best Seller” featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and the author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration Isabel Wilkerson.

author books journalism race history isabel wilkerson

"There’s a part of your reading life when you don’t know enough to be a snob. So you read The Bluest Eye, and then you read Archie Comics, and then you read Philip K. Dick, and then you read The Firm, and then you read The Sound and the Fury, and then you put it down because you don’t understand what the fuck it’s saying. At the same time you’re reading Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, and you still have a little crush on Ramona Quimby, but you’re also reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being because your sister gave it to you and said it’s about sex. There are just no boundaries between high and low and genre and literary, and it’s great. It’s only later that you start saying, “Oh, I never read that.” Well, bullshit. Of course you read it. And you liked it, too. I liked all those books."
-author Daniel Alarcon, interviewed by David Burr Gerrard in Full Stop

"There’s a part of your reading life when you don’t know enough to be a snob. So you read The Bluest Eye, and then you read Archie Comics, and then you read Philip K. Dick, and then you read The Firm, and then you read The Sound and the Fury, and then you put it down because you don’t understand what the fuck it’s saying. At the same time you’re reading Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, and you still have a little crush on Ramona Quimby, but you’re also reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being because your sister gave it to you and said it’s about sex. There are just no boundaries between high and low and genre and literary, and it’s great. It’s only later that you start saying, “Oh, I never read that.” Well, bullshit. Of course you read it. And you liked it, too. I liked all those books."

-author Daniel Alarcon, interviewed by David Burr Gerrard in Full Stop

Daniel Alarcon David Burr Gerrard books author lit interview

Selling on the Street: The Writer as Hustler | Tin House

"To make money in writing, likely in any art, you have to hustle. You don’t have to sell on the street, but you can’t write in today’s world without knowing that you do so in the swamp of a shifting publishing landscape. Big changes define our era: the magazine advertising crash of 2007; the numerous shuttered newspapers; The New York Times’ paywall and blogs and restructuring to stay solvent; the shrinking advances of commercial book publishers; and the strengths of the independent press. [Writer Adrian] Brune was just selling writing to make rent, but her efforts mark one front of the literary vanguard, an example of the many ways writers and publishers are experimenting with new techniques, or rekindling old ones, that push publishing in new directions. As scrappy an underdog as I felt on 13th Avenue, I also felt free, felt liberated and empowered. I could do whatever I wanted, all of us could. We just weren’t going to rake in the dough."

(Source: nogreatillusion)

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