"One of the fundamental tenets of the labor movement has always been that all work is worthy of respect; that there are no degrading jobs, only degrading conditions. It was not, [Barbara] Ehrenreich noted, that housework was manual labor, as [Betty] Friedan argued, that made it degrading, but rather, ‘because it was embedded in degrading relationships and inevitably served to reinforce them. To make a mess that another person will have to deal with—the dropped socks, the toothpaste sprayed on the bathroom mirror, the dirty dishes left from a late-night snack—is to exert domination in one of its more silent and intimate forms.’”
Sarah Jaffe, “Trickle-Down Feminism,” Dissent Magazine
Feb 24, 2013 / 2 notes

"One of the fundamental tenets of the labor movement has always been that all work is worthy of respect; that there are no degrading jobs, only degrading conditions. It was not, [Barbara] Ehrenreich noted, that housework was manual labor, as [Betty] Friedan argued, that made it degrading, but rather, ‘because it was embedded in degrading relationships and inevitably served to reinforce them. To make a mess that another person will have to deal with—the dropped socks, the toothpaste sprayed on the bathroom mirror, the dirty dishes left from a late-night snack—is to exert domination in one of its more silent and intimate forms.’”

Sarah Jaffe, “Trickle-Down Feminism,” Dissent Magazine

Source: dissentmagazine.org

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