cattrebuchet asked:

how is NPR covering/planning to cover what's going on in Ferguson, MO currently?

Grace Bello Answer:

npr:

Hi, 

We currently have several reporters on the ground in Missouri. Gene Demby is one and he’s well worth a Twitter follow.

You can see all of our coverage here. I would also be remiss if I didn’t point out the excellent coverage coming out of St. Louis Public Radio. Their liveblogging and livetweeting have been excellent ways to stay up to date, around the clock. 

Mel 

Ferguson news

guernicamag:

"When I read Flannery O’Connor, she really took the lid off my skull. Her blending of the grotesque and the comic as well as her reverence for mystery really affected me." Night Vision, Geoff Mak interviews Karen Russell - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & PoliticsHave you read our new issue? Featuring this interview with Karen Russell, dispatches from Gaza and reflections on service in Iraq, a novel excerpt from Brian Hart, and more!

guernicamag:

"When I read Flannery O’Connor, she really took the lid off my skull. Her blending of the grotesque and the comic as well as her reverence for mystery really affected me."

Night Vision, Geoff Mak interviews Karen Russell - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

Have you read our new issue? Featuring this interview with Karen Russell, dispatches from Gaza and reflections on service in Iraq, a novel excerpt from Brian Hart, and more!

Karen Russell books lit fiction Flannery O'Connor

"

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

"
-

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

(via mensahdemary)

work labor

normcore-dad:

Shout out to Al Jazeera straight up showing a video of their reporters getting tear gassed during a live interview of the Ferguson police chief denying that they are tear gassing journalists.

(via goldman)

Ferguson

Further Reading

thenewinquiry:

To Supplement Dr. Christina Sharpe’s essay, Black Life, Annotated, TNI asked Sharpe to create a syllabus for further reading on the subject and she graciously obliged, with help from Mariame Kaba and Dr. Tamara Nopper.

Introduction to The Prison Industrial Complex

Introduction to The Prison Industrial Complex

I recommend everything on the blog Prison Culture “How the PIC Structures Our World…”

The Black Youth Project

Young People Continue To Talk About the Cops

Louder Than A Bomb 2014: Chicago Youth Have Their Say 

Nicholas K. Peart, “Why Is the N.Y.P.D. After Me?

C Angel Torres and Naima Paz, Young Women’s Empowerment Project’s Bad Encounter Line zine

Rose Brewer and Nancy Heitzeg, The Racialization of Crime and Punishment: Criminal Justice, Color-Blind Racism, and the Political Economy of the Prison Industrial Complex

Sylvia Wynter, “No Humans Involved: An Open Letter to My Colleagues

On Fugitivity and Captivity

Slave narratives, from Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of A Slave Girl: Written by Herself, to Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass An American Slave: Written by Himself, to David Walker’s Appeal, to Ida B. Well’s The Red Record

Keguro Macharia, fugitivity

Fred Moten and Stefano Harvey, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study

Tavia Nyong’o, Black Survival in the Uchromatic Dark

Percy Howard Interviews Frank Wilderson Frank B. Wilderson, “Wallowing in the contradictions”, Parts 1 and 2

Jared Sexton, Captivity, By Turns: A Comment on the Work of Ashley Hunt

Connie Wun, Disciplining Violence

Tamara K. Nopper and Kenyon Farrow, Why the AFL-CIO must address Black criminalization and (un)employment: A position paper

To Watch & Listen

Joy James, Refusing Blackness as Victimization: Trayvon Martin and the Black Cyborgs

Angela Davis, On the Prison Industrial Complex

Ruth Gilmore, Beyond The Prison Industrial Complex

Murder on a Sunday Morning (documentary)

Damien Sojoyner, “Trouble Man: The Limitations of Policy Oriented Black Masculinity

You Don’t Really Know Us,” Chicago Kids Tell News Media

Simone Browne, Dark Sousveillance Race, Surveillance and Resistance

Books

A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison by Reginald Dwayne Betts

States of Confinement: Policing, Detention, and Prisons edited by Joy James

Warfare in the American Homeland: Policing and Prison in a Penal Democracy edited by Joy James (2007)

Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation by Beth Richie

Global Lockdown: Race, Gender and the Prison-Industrial Complex edited by Julia Sudbury

Live from Death Row by Mumia Abu-Jamal

Police Brutality: An Anthology edited by Jill Nelson

(via pushinghoopswithsticks)

prison police race politics